Talking the Talk

Moving abroad with toddlers during a crucial cognitive and linguistic developmental time is sometimes worrisome. And because we’ve been around so many cultures and different languages, we are aiming to improve how our children communicate verbally (albeit, emotionally and indirectly, they are rock stars at communicating…haha). They are just learning to talk more; although, we must admit that often-times we’ve compared them a bit as many two and three year olds speak their native tongue more clearly than they do. In fact, I would sometimes wonder why they aren’t speaking the same way as their peers. It’s my own being-a-mama-postpartum-critique, but I digress as we all know each child is on his own journey destined by God.IMG_0092.jpgThe boys love flash cards and I found these on Amazon, which I highly recommend. They are the best ones we’ve come across and we always look forward to evenings when we do our words, letters, numbers, animals, etc. together as a family. The boys are so attentive and ask lots of questions. They can associate seeing a picture of a “deebra” with the fact that they’ve actually fed a zebra…or the sound of a hippo with the fact that they’ve seen a hippo here in Africa…same with “elfat,” “wion,” and “ieyna.” Their accents, lisps, and all are the cutest things and we must embrace it because a time will come when they are speaking like us…we’ll miss these days. The toddler years are becoming more joyous (well, when they aren’t throwing food, biting, hitting, falling out, or [now] pinching…they can get wild). We are thankful. Such homeschooling and world schooling views were in a prior post, but as we know, we [as parents] are their first teachers. We look forward to continuing to encourage their speech as we’ve also always encouraged any caregivers to speak to them in their local language, too. Thankfully, we speak English so we figure they’ll learn it well enough at some point 🙂